Simanaitis Says

On cars, old, new and future; science & technology; vintage airplanes, computer flight simulation of them; Sherlockiana; our English language; travel; and other stuff

Category Archives: I Usta be an Editor Y’Know

WELCOMING NEW (AND OLD) WORDS TO THE OED

I MUST confess that our family Compact Edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, 1971, is appearing smaller and smaller each month. The OED’s official website has cited “New Words in … Continue reading

March 22, 2019 · Leave a comment

WHAT’S THAT IN OLD ENGLISH? PART 2

YESTERDAY IN “What’s That in Old English Part 1,” we concluded with edhwierfe!, the Old English verb “to return” in its imperative singular case. Given that you have returned, today … Continue reading

March 6, 2019 · Leave a comment

WHAT’S THAT IN OLD ENGLISH? PART 1

HERE ARE some tidbits about Old English, OE, for short, gleaned from a recent exhibition at the British Museum, a BBC article reviewing this exhibition, and my usual Internet sleuthing. … Continue reading

March 5, 2019 · 3 Comments

STYLISH WRITING PART 2

YESTERDAY IN PART 1, several sources were cited as references here at SimanaitisSays: Merriam-Webster, Karen Elizabeth Gordon’s The Deluxe Transitive Vampire: The Ultimate Handbook of Grammar for the Innocent, the … Continue reading

February 21, 2019 · 1 Comment

STYLISH WRITING PART 1

THERE’S NO SHORTAGE of authorities on writing style, some of them even worth emulating. Readers of SimanaitisSays may already sense my trust in two sources, Merriam-Webster and The Compact Edition … Continue reading

February 20, 2019 · Leave a comment

DASH IT ALL!

THERE’S A MULTIPLICITY of punctuation marks that look quite similar: -, –, —, and ―. These are, respectively, the hyphen, the en dash, the em dash, and the horizontal bar. … Continue reading

February 12, 2019 · Leave a comment

SEVERAL MATHEMATICAL ETYMOLOGIES

WORDS IN MATHEMATICS have precise meanings. No surprise, this. And sometimes their etymologies have good tales to tell. Let’s look at “theorem,” and two of its related terms, “corollary” and … Continue reading

January 23, 2019 · 2 Comments