Simanaitis Says

On cars, old, new and future; science & technology; vintage airplanes, computer flight simulation of them; Sherlockiana; our English language; travel; and other stuff

THE TRAGEDY/SUCCESS OF THE COMMONS

WHAT FOLLOWS is a brief account of a philosophical concept in the social sciences. My account is brief for two reasons: I haven’t the space here nor the depth of … Continue reading

July 11, 2018 · Leave a comment

WHEN IS THAT?

OUR ENGLISH language has the word “today.” For the day immediately prior, we have “yesterday.” And for the day immediately following, there’s “tomorrow.” From there on, passages of time in … Continue reading

July 10, 2018 · Leave a comment

WAS SHERLOCK HOLMES AN AMERICAN? PART 2

YESTERDAY, NONE other than noted Sherlockian Franklin Delano Roosevelt offered the view that the world’s first consulting detective was indeed an American. Here in Part 2, we hear from another … Continue reading

July 9, 2018 · Leave a comment

WAS SHERLOCK HOLMES AN AMERICAN? PART 1

THERE’S SOLID evidence provided by chronicler Dr. John H. Watson that Sherlock Holmes visited the United States. But is it possible, nay probable, that the world’s first and greatest consulting … Continue reading

July 8, 2018 · Leave a comment

ETYMOLOGY—ELOQUENT, INARTICULATE

EVERY SO often, the meaning of a word surprises me. As an example, consider the word “eloquent.” It conjures up thoughts of classic Roman orations or the most memorable of … Continue reading

July 7, 2018 · 1 Comment

THE CRADLE WILL ROCK—80 YEARS LATER PART 2

MARC BLITZSTEIN’S The Cradle Will Rock was inspired by U.S. labor unrest of the 1930s. However, its story and the tale of its 1937 production are timely today. Blitzstein’s The … Continue reading

July 6, 2018 · 1 Comment

THE CRADLE WILL ROCK—80 YEARS LATER PART 1

AMERICAN COMPOSER Marc Blitzstein’s 1937 The Cradle Will Rock was a product of the Depression and yet it resonates with today’s less than tranquil times. Originally part of the government’s … Continue reading

July 5, 2018 · Leave a comment