Simanaitis Says

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Tag Archives: AAAS Science magazine

ELEMENTAL HAIKU

A HAIKU, as is familiarly known, is a Japanese poem of a particular length and structure. It consists of three lines, the first and last having five sound units, the … Continue reading

September 6, 2017 · 1 Comment

HERMANN THE GERMAN JOINS THE GREATER HUMAN RACE

MIGRATION, ETHNICITY, and racial purity have been much in the news these days. Fortunately, so have the stabilizing influences of scientific research. In particular, goodbye to a favorite myth believed … Continue reading

June 26, 2017 · Leave a comment

CONGRESS, THE PRESIDENT AND THE S-WORD (SCIENCE)

TWO ARTICLES on the same two-page spread of Science, May 5, 2017, suggest the turmoil taking place in scientific communities funded at least in part by the federal government. One … Continue reading

June 1, 2017 · Leave a comment

HAVE YOU DONE AS WELL AS YOUR PARENTS?

IT IS THE hope of parents that their kids will, in some sense, do better than they’ve done. The metric might be wealth, education, status or general happiness. Alas, according … Continue reading

May 12, 2017 · 1 Comment

SCIENCE AND GOVERNMENT POLICY

TWO SUCCESSIVE issues of Science magazine have multiple articles on science and government policy. Here I glean tidbits from two pieces in particular: Informing Policy with Science was a Science … Continue reading

March 5, 2017 · 3 Comments

ON CEPHALOPODS

THAT KID’S book review may have said, “This book tells me more about whales than I want to know.” On the other hand, I’m fascinated by the book Other Minds: … Continue reading

December 30, 2016 · Leave a comment

NANOPOROUS FABRICS MAY KEEP US COOL

THE SAME SCIENTIFIC principle that explains a blue sky might bring new fabrics that keep us cool. Researchers have recently engineered polyethylenes that are measurably better than cotton or “cool” … Continue reading

September 15, 2016 · 3 Comments

GEOLOGICALLY SPEAKING, WHAT TIME IS IT?

LET’S TALK ABOUT geology’s time clock. Stratigraphy concerns what can be learned from the order and relative position of rock layers. The word is a Latin/Greek hybrid: stratum Latin for … Continue reading

September 5, 2016 · Leave a comment

MORE POWER TO YA

AMERICA’S POWER GRID is the largest in the world. But it’s not the most modern, nor the most reliable. Gretchen Bakke’s book The Grid addresses these points and others. Cymene Howe … Continue reading

August 28, 2016 · Leave a comment

METHUSELAH AND THE BOMB

ABOVE-GROUND NUCLEAR weaponry helped researchers identify longevity of the Greenland shark, the world’s oldest known living vertebrate. Recently, a 400-year-old shark made the news; details of the research are given … Continue reading

August 23, 2016 · 1 Comment