Simanaitis Says

On cars, old, new and future; science & technology; vintage airplanes, computer flight simulation of them; Sherlockiana; our English language; travel; and other stuff

Category Archives: The Game is Afoot

DR. JOHN H. WATSON—FASHIONISTO

SHERLOCKIAN CHRISTOPHER MORLEY wrote that “Watson was a couturier at heart.” Today, maybe we’d say fashionisto, masculinizing the term “fashionista,” defined in Merriam-Webster as “a designer, promotor, or follower of … Continue reading

December 2, 2018 · Leave a comment

HOLMES AND THE BARD PART 2

FOR SOMEONE whose knowledge of literature was first thought “nil” by Doctor John H. Watson, Sherlock Holmes quoted Shakespeare a goodly number of times. We started all this yesterday here … Continue reading

October 17, 2018 · 1 Comment

HOLMES AND THE BARD OF AVON PART 1

HOW WELL did the world’s greatest consulting detective know his Shakespeare? Based on Dr. John H. Watson’s initial assessments, not very much at all. On the other hand, Sherlockian scholars … Continue reading

October 16, 2018 · Leave a comment

THE CHASLES VRAIN-LUCAS SCAM PART 2

YESTERDAY IN Part 1, Michel Chasles was ecstatic having bought a letter from fellow Frenchman Denis Vrain-Lucas. This letter proved that French scientist Blaise Pascal had figured out gravitation before … Continue reading

October 7, 2018 · Leave a comment

THE CHASLES VRAIN-LUCAS SCAM PART 1

SOMETIMES PASSIONATE highly intelligent people are the easiest marks. Or so it seemed with 19th-century French mathematician Michel Chasles. Chasles had a passion for collecting antiquarian ephemera; fellow Frenchman Denis … Continue reading

October 6, 2018 · 1 Comment

AS HARD-BOILED AS A SHAMUS’S SIMILE PART 2

YESTERDAY AT SimanaitisSays, we talked about the difference between similes and metaphors, defined the word “shamus,” and extolled mystery author Raymond Chandler as a master of all three. Today, I … Continue reading

September 28, 2018 · Leave a comment

AS HARD-BOILED AS A SHAMUS’S SIMILE PART 1

RAYMOND CHANDLER said hard-boiled literature of the 1920s and 1930s “made most of the fiction of the time taste like a cup of luke-warm consommé at a spinsterish tea room.” … Continue reading

September 27, 2018 · 2 Comments