Simanaitis Says

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Category Archives: Classic Bits

RACE TO THE CLOUDS, R&T’S 1956 REPORT

NEW HAMPSHIRE’S Mt. Washington is among the most prominent peaks in the U.S. And, as reported in R&T, it’s renowned as a hillclimb venue and notorious for erratic weather as … Continue reading

January 4, 2019 · 3 Comments

OH SOY, CAN YOU SAY? PART 2

YESTERDAY, IN PART 1, livestock and we savored tidbits of soy ranging from soy meal to soy sauce to edamame to tofu to faux meat to the challenge of food … Continue reading

December 14, 2018 · Leave a comment

MG TC—1949

LONG BEFORE there were Porsches and Corvettes, decades before Mustangs and Miatas, there was the MG TC. So the story goes, G.I.s returning after World War II brought home these … Continue reading

December 6, 2018 · 3 Comments

FORD THUNDERBIRD—1956

FROM A SALES point of view, Ford nailed it with the first-generation Thunderbird. Introduced as a “personal luxury” two-seater in late 1954, the T-Bird outsold Chevrolet’s Corvette sports car at … Continue reading

November 14, 2018 · 3 Comments

CELEBRATING OSCA

OSCA IS short for Officine Specializzate Costruzione Automobili—Fratelli Maserati. In business between 1947 and 1967, this Italian automaker fabricated some of the swoopiest, snarliest, and most potent of sports cars. … Continue reading

November 7, 2018 · 1 Comment

1940 AUTO AVIO COSTRUZIONI TIPO 815

THE FIRST FERRARI wasn’t called a Ferrari. Yet it is quite an automobile with a tale to tell. What’s more, Jim Donick, editor of Vintage Sports Car, the quarterly magazine … Continue reading

November 2, 2018 · 3 Comments

HURRAH FOR TILLY SHILLING—ENGINEER, RACER, AND MORE PART 2

WE LEFT Beatrice “Tilly” Shilling yesterday at SimanaitisSays in her new position as a researcher at the Royal Aircraft Establishment, the R&D arm of the RAF. It was 1936. She … Continue reading

November 1, 2018 · Leave a comment